Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Walt Jocketty on Shin-Soo Choo: 'We have to move on'


Given the shrinking list of teams reportedly interested in top free agent Shin-Soo Choo, it was beginning to look like the Reds may actually have a shot at re-signing the on-base machine. Many of Choo's potential suitors virtually eliminated themselves by allocating their money to someone or somewhere else. So there was a little glimmer of hope that Cincinnati may miraculously be able to bring the valuable outfielder back.

Well, that hope was all but squashed Wednesday afternoon when general manager Walt Jocketty met with reporters, and basically confirmed what most of us already knew.

“I think we have to move on,” he somberly said. “We have to plan as if we’re moving on.”

It remains to be seen which team will actually land the coveted hitter. The favorites heading into the offseason have already addressed personnel issues by other means and aren't likely to jump back into the bidding. These teams include the Yankees, Tigers, Mariners, and Diamondbacks, among others.

Choo's agent, Scott Boras, sparked quite a spectacle Wednesday afternoon when he graced the winter meetings' lobby with his presence. Reporters converged on Boras in what can only be likened to a scrum at a rock concert. It was then when Boras raved about Choo's ability and value in an effort to drive his client's price tag even higher. It's a price tag that is reportedly being dangled at roughly $140 million over seven years.

Even if the Reds were able to match those outlandish demands, I'm not sure it would be best for them to do so long-term. As good as Choo was in 2013, the season could go down as the best of his career, which would not bode well for whichever team decides to pay for his future years.

So as Reds fans begin to fully cope with the loss of Choo, perhaps it's not so bad after all. The Reds won't saddle themselves with another colossal contract for a player that may or may not be worth a fraction of the overall money he is owed.

Photo Credit: Sports Illustrated

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